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Brook Henry's History

Brook grew up in New Zealand where it was clear from an early age that he was very mechanically minded, always inquisitive of how things worked, and how they were put together.
His father was often heard to say that “If my son was left on the platform of the Hamilton train station with a screwdriver, in half an hour there wouldn’t be a train left bolted together”
     
He and his brothers regularly constructed vehicles out of whatever engines and parts were available to them.
Unfortunately some of these home-built exploits landed them in a spot of bother when he and his brothers successfully constructed a full size replica 1912 Curtiss bi-plane out of aluminium and reinforced plastic sheet bought from a local building site.
 

After spectators of their impressive maiden flight alerted the authorities

The aeroplane was grounded as it had no registration, no safety certificates, and none of them had a pilot’s licence. The local aviation museum were very pleased to accept the replica as a donation, where it was suspended from the ceiling on display.

Brook focused his natural engineering ability by being taken on as a toolmaking apprentice, where he served a 9000 hour contract with Alex Harvey Industries, leaving when he was 18 years old, whilst his brothers started a business importing Ducati’s into NZ. Brook spent his spare time surrounding these machines, and was responsible for uncarting every bevel-drive model that came into the country.
He then travelled to Australia, Europe and finally the UK, where he lived for a few years, leaving shortly after the legendary comeback victory that Mike Hailwood achieved at the 1978 Isle of Man TT.

Upon his return, Brook joined forces with a friend and founded Webrook Engineering, a general engineering firm. In his spare time, Brook decided to build himself a racebike, and wanted to race a Ducati like the ones that he had spent his younger years uncarting and working on at his brothers’ business. Brook soon learned that there were areas where the motor could be improved, and set about radically chopping and modifying the engine and frame of his 1978 Ducati 900SS (bought in 1978 as a nearly brand new insurance write off), all with the aim of having a rolling billboard for Webrook. After several people took notice of his work, Brook changed the name and focus of the business to Vee Two, as it was these Ducati V-twin engines that really interested him, and thus Vee Two was founded in 1979 in Bayswater, Western Australia.

Brook is a lover of horsepower, and likes nothing better than burning petrol to make things go fast. His favourite saying is "You can never have too much horsepower!" This love of powerful things extends to other parts of Brook’s life as well. For example, the workshop stereo is a vintage PA 7-speaker, triple-amped 6000 watt system lifted from a cinema.

But it is his love for bevel-drive Ducatis that surpasses everything else, and having the life-long dream of building his own full brand new bevel engine come into reality is giving him a new burst of energy as Vee Two starts in a comeback of its own.

 

    • Tool making apprenticeship – 9000hour contract – 18 years old

    • Travelled to Australia from NZ, then onto Europe

    • Returned from Europe after the 1978 Hailwood TT win

    • Co-founded Webrook engineering in 1978, running until 1985

    • Founded Vee Two in 1979 in Bayswater, WA.

    • Lover of horsepower, whether motorcycle or powerful vintage audio PA equipment (cinema system in workshop)

    • Variable timing/lift valve design presented to Ducati factory’s Chief Engineer Massimo Bordi, but didn’t make it to production before he retired from his position

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